Find Your Next Great Read with Book Browse

The library is now offering Book Browse database to all of our patrons.

This website offers you in-depth book reviews, author interviews, book previews, and reading guides. There are many features that can help readers find the next book they will like and this database is meant to help you save time finding that next book. Here are some highlights from this comprehensive database:

What’s New” tab:

Under this tab you will find book news, articles, what other readers recommend, and what’s getting published this week.

You will also find the Editor’s Choice section. In this section, you can read reviews, an excerpt from the book and explore the historical, cultural and contextual aspects of the book.

Find Books” tab:

Under this tab you will find the Young Adults page.

You will also find a Featured Books section with hand-picked books for young adults and more recent titles.

Another great part of this page are the Reading Lists. You can click on any term and a list of books in that genre will come up for YA.

The Read-Alikes Tab:

If you enjoyed a certain book and would like to read something similar you can visit this section where you will find hand-selected read-alikes. It breaks it down for you by title to title and author to author recommendations.

This database is perfect for readers 10 and up! Visit Book Browse Here!

The Great Giveback

Saturday October 19, 2020 will be the third annual Great Give Back. The Great Give Back is a community service initiative created by the Suffolk County Library Directors Association and the Suffolk Cooperative Library System in conjunction with the Nassau County Library System.

The mission of The Great Give Back is to provide a day of opportunities for the patrons of the Public Libraries of New York State to participate in meaningful, service-oriented experiences.

Community service and volunteerism have always been very important to me. When I was in middle school and high school I belonged to many clubs and organizations that had community service and volunteerism as their central tenants and it’s one of the reasons I manage so many of our community service programs here.

I love our annual Great Give Back; it is a wonderful opportunity for the entire family to get involved and enjoy the benefits of community service and volunteerism. This is a great way for us to share with our children how volunteering makes a difference and how good it feels to help other people in our community and to enact change.

I am so excited for this year’s Great Give Back activities. This year for The Great Give Back we are:

Inviting teens to participate on our Instagram for Teentober. Help us promote the library by creating social media posts for our Instagram.

Inviting everyone from our tiniest tots to our wisest retirees to make cards for the residents of the Berkshires Nursing Home. Register to receive a cardmaking kit; after decorating your cards return them to the basket in the Children’s room.

Inviting everyone in our community to join us for a Clean Up our Community event. Meet us at the library for gloves, bags, and masks.

I hope you decide to join us for any or all of these amazing Great Give Back opportunities. We look forward to seeing you there!

It’s OK to take Me Time

Sometimes we feel guilty for putting our self first but I am here to tell it’s OK to pamper yourself everyone once a while. Go for a nice walk, binge watch some TV, read a book, or have a nice glass of wine. There is nothing wrong with wanting a little alone time to recuperate your mind, body, and spirit. As a wife, mother, and librarian I find myself overwhelmed sometimes, especially during these new and challenging times we are facing as a country. I have learned to step back from it all and take a moment for myself. I am going to share with you some resources that you can use to help you with Me Time.

Great eBooks and eAudio books can be found searching the catalog at https://lindenhurstlibrary.org/, such topics you can search is mindfulness, relaxation, mediation, reiki, yoga, and more….

If you want to binge watch some TV then Hoopla is the site for you. It has so many genres for you to choose from and can be view on a computer, smartphone, or tablet. You can also flip through a magazine on the Flipster. Flipster has a variety of magazine that can be view on any internet connected device or you can download the Flipster app. All of these create resources can be found at https://lindenhurstlibrary.org/digital/.

Don’t want to stay indoors for your Me Time, then head outside. You can always walk around your neighbor or head to a local state park. Here is the site to find a park in your area https://parks.ny.gov/, but please remember to abide by social distancing rules.

There are so many ways you can take your Me Time. You just need to find what works for you. It is important to take care of yourself, as you are taking care of others.

Banned Books Week

Banned Books Week reminds us to celebrate our freedom to read, draws attention to banned and challenged books, and highlights individuals who have been persecuted. Taking the time to read what you want is a part of exercising your First Amendment rights!

Keep the celebration up by doing these things:

Read a Banned Book

This may seem like an obvious choice, but it’s also the most effective! Check out this list of banned Children’s and YA books or choose one from our bibliography:

YA Banned/Challenged Books

Children’s Banned/Challenged Books

Reach Out to an Author

Tell an author how much their work means to you! Reach out to an author who’s on the banned books list or to an author you enjoy.

Writing a book takes a lot of effort and can be extremely challenging. You can reach out through social media, their websites or e-mail and let them know much you appreciate, value, and love the books they share with us.

Share a Banned Books Infographic

Infographics like this one from American Library Association can be posted and shared on social media apps. ALA has other infographics that can be downloaded and shared in order to spread awareness.

ALA Infographic Downloads

Join or Host a Virtual Read-Out

The Banned Books Week Read-Out is your way to stand up to censorship and exercise your rights by reading from a banned book or discussing censorship issues on camera. Since 1982, banned authors such as Judy Blume, Dav Pilkey, and John Green have participated in this read-out. Join them and others and have the chance to be added to the Banned Books Week YouTube channel.

Get Informed

Another great thing you can do is educate yourself. Read about what Banned Books week is and its history. Then learn about the history of the books that were challenged and banned.

Do you know the difference between a challenged book and a banned book? A challenge is only an attempt to remove or restrict material, based solely on the opinions of a person or group. Challenging a book is damaging because it could restrict access to others. When you ban a book, you remove the material.

Process Art

It may surprise you to know that I do not consider myself artistic. Most of my time spent creating displays for the library bulletin boards or coming up with crafts to do with the teens is actually spent figuring out how to get around my less than mediocre drawing ability and make my vision a reality; and that is why I love process art.

Process art consists of art activities that are more focused on what you did to create the art than what you want the final product to be. Everyone’s project is supposed to be unique and self- directed rather then following a specific set of steps or instruction that’s focused on everyone creating the exact same thing. A lot of the discussion surrounding process art is focused on younger children. Process art is great because it fosters creativity and joy in the process of creating. But process art is great for older kids, teens and adults for the same reasons and because the focus is not on the final project but on the fun of creating can also be very empowering for those that feel like they have no artistic ability whatsoever, like me.

Process art also tends to be a lot less work to set up and usually requires fewer specialized supplies. Check out the tutorials below for some fun process art activities or craft along with me on YouTube; there’s Geometric Art and Monoprinting.

We used old pediatric Tylenol droppers but if you let the salt dry you can just paint the watercolors on with a paintbrush.

Looking for more great process art ideas? Check out these books from Live-brary. I know they’re pre-school focused but I have had just as much fun (if not more fun) creating projects with these techniques as my daughter and have gotten some great ideas for things to do with the teens as well.

Do you have any favorite process art projects you want to share? Tell us in the comments!

#LookToLibraries

Did you know children’s library professionals have access to information, resources, and community partnerships that contribute to the development of materials, programs, and services that support families in their library communities? Through ALSC, you can create an informed media plan that best suits your family’s needs and navigate through the hardships brought on by COVID-19.

#LookToLibraries for Media Mentorship 

Navigating the extent of digital devices and content available to young children can be daunting for parents and caregivers, and even more so during times of crises. These resources help to develop a media plan that best addresses your family’s needs. These tools have been available through the library and, just as families have had to adapt their expectations and guidelines for media use, libraries are continuously adapting to accommodate new situations and new challenges, like that of the COVID-19 pandemic.   

Media Mentorship Tip Sheet – Learn more about media mentorship and how you can find excellent resources, model safe and effective digital device use, and find objective suggestions on creating a family media plan.

To Tech or Not to Tech? The Debate about Technology, Young Children, and the Library  By Kathleen Campana, J. Elizabeth Mills, Claudia Haines, Tess Prendergast, and Marianne Martens

Where Are We Now? The Evolving Use of New Media with Young Children in Libraries  By Kathleen Campana, J. Elizabeth Mills, Marianne Martens, Claudia Haines 

#LookToLibraries for Support during a Pandemic 

The resources below can help families and their children navigate and adjust to drastic changes in routines and the lack of access to familiar people and places as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Tough Conversations Tip Sheet  – Consider the strategies of Fred Rogers, of Mr. Rogers Neighborhood, that describe how to talk with children about difficult topics.

Apps, Podcasts, and Activities – Apps, podcasts, and activities to support family well-being during the pandemic.

Books for Older Children – Titles for older children that include nonfiction information about epidemics and ways to manage anxiety.

Books for Young Children – Books to help young children understand germs and how to cope with the feelings they may be having.

Comforting Reads – times of crises bring times of change. These books were selected to help children going through challenging situations like the death of a loved one, an unexpected move, natural disasters, and more. 

COVID-19 Expert Resources Tip Sheet  – Connections to information about the virus to help children understand the pandemic.

COVID-19 Resources Tip Sheet  – Print and online books, articles, apps, podcasts, and websites for youth and parents/caregivers to provide support during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Online Books for Children – Online books for children that address the COVID-19 pandemic and how to cope with its challenges.

Resources for Parents/Caregivers – Books and articles to help parents and caregivers on a range of topics, from caring for a newborn in the age of COVID-19 to trying to balance parenting and coping with the pandemic.

Tough Topics – The books on these lists are to help inspire conversations with children going through challenging situations like the death of a loved one, an unexpected move, natural disasters, and more. 

Seed Library

Ask any teen that volunteered in last summer’s Community Gardeners program and they will tell you that I am not a gardener. I do not know what anything is called; I do not know how to weed; I do not know when things are ready to pick. Most questions were answered with either, “Hang on, let me text Ms. Joni and ask her” or “Let’s look that up!” I learned a lot doing Community Gardeners with the teens last year and was looking forward to this years program. I was also excited about trying to grow something with my daughter this year with everything I learned last year. I was a little worried since last year we tried to grow Purple Cone Flowers and we never got past the tiny green sprout.😢

This year Ms. Joni gave me seeds from our seed library to try with my daughter. She gave us some green peas, chinese greens and zinnias. We planted the peas Mother’s Day weekend.

My daughter is so excited to see her peas growing! We planted them in hanging containers and we are hoping that when they get big enough they will drape over the sides instead of having to be trained up something. (Ms. Joni says they will!)

Do you want to participate in our seed library? Check out this display the next time you’re in the library. It is immediately to the right of the front door when you first walk in. You can get seeds and in the fall you can even turn in seeds for next year.

What are you growing in your garden this year? Did you get any seeds from our seed libraries? Let us know in the comments!

Drawing

One thing that I’ve always liked to do is draw. When I was growing up, I took lots of art classes in high school and a lot more in college. Every now and then I still make the time to draw, but I’m always looking for ways on how I can improve my skill. Do you like to draw too? Drawing is a great way to relax and develop creativity. With the help of some of these books from Overdrive or Libby, you can have fun learning how to draw.

https://livebrary.overdrive.com/media/554906
https://livebrary.overdrive.com/library/kids/media/3455705
https://livebrary.overdrive.com/media/576804
https://livebrary.overdrive.com/media/1000551
https://livebrary.overdrive.com/library/teens/media/1192990
https://livebrary.overdrive.com/library/teens/media/635380
https://livebrary.overdrive.com/library/kids/media/1260245

Social Justice: A Guide for Parents

Social justice is the view that everyone deserves to enjoy the same economic, political and social rights, regardless of race, socioeconomic status, gender or other characteristics.

Right now your child may have a lot of questions about what’s going on in our country. Here are some resources and books to facilitate important conversations and connections.

Websites and Articles:

Anti-Racism Resources for All Ages An excellent collection of videos, books, articles, and lessons on anti-racism, activism, and critical race theory curated by Dr. Nicole A. Cooke of the University of South Carolina.

Five Ways to Reduce Racial Bias in Your Children (by Greater Good magazine): Trustworthy practical tips from UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center.

Critical Racial and Social Justice Education Robin D’Angelo PhD offers resources, tools, and hand outs for parents, educators or anyone looking to learn about social justice.

Talking About Race (by the National Museum of African American History & Culture): This toolkit provides in-depth resources for caregivers, educators, and individuals to reflect on race, power, and privilege, all in the interest of having constructive, equity-oriented conversations.

Critical Media Project An indispensable collection of videos and activities focusing on how identity is represented and negotiated in media.

Social Justice Books (by Teaching for Change): Selected books for preschool and elementary aged children. This list of books intersects with all kinds of important cultural and social issues that will help your child build perspective.

Videos:

Helping Kids Process Violence, Trauma, Race in a World of Non-Stop News (Common Sense): Join child development, children’s health, and trauma-care experts in this practical talk about how parents and educators can help kids process potentially traumatic news. 

Racism and Violence How to Help Kids Handle the News (Child Mind Institute): Learn about the best, research-backed ways to handle tough conversations with kids about racist violence in the media and news.

Reading List for Toddlers – Teens Available for Download

July is National Ice Cream Month

Did you know that July is National Ice Cream Month? In 1984, President Ronald Reagan designated July as National Ice Cream Month and the third Sunday of the month as National Ice Cream Day.  In the proclamation, President Reagan called for all people of the United States to observe these events with “appropriate ceremonies and activities.” And we do! According to the International Dairy Foods Association, the average American consumes more than 23 pounds of ice cream per year. So why not enjoy these ice cream themed books, while enjoying some homemade ice cream!

Don’t have an ice cream maker on hand? Try this no churn recipe.