Social Justice: A Guide for Parents

Social justice is the view that everyone deserves to enjoy the same economic, political and social rights, regardless of race, socioeconomic status, gender or other characteristics.

Right now your child may have a lot of questions about what’s going on in our country. Here are some resources and books to facilitate important conversations and connections.

Websites and Articles:

Anti-Racism Resources for All Ages An excellent collection of videos, books, articles, and lessons on anti-racism, activism, and critical race theory curated by Dr. Nicole A. Cooke of the University of South Carolina.

Five Ways to Reduce Racial Bias in Your Children (by Greater Good magazine): Trustworthy practical tips from UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center.

Critical Racial and Social Justice Education Robin D’Angelo PhD offers resources, tools, and hand outs for parents, educators or anyone looking to learn about social justice.

Talking About Race (by the National Museum of African American History & Culture): This toolkit provides in-depth resources for caregivers, educators, and individuals to reflect on race, power, and privilege, all in the interest of having constructive, equity-oriented conversations.

Critical Media Project An indispensable collection of videos and activities focusing on how identity is represented and negotiated in media.

Social Justice Books (by Teaching for Change): Selected books for preschool and elementary aged children. This list of books intersects with all kinds of important cultural and social issues that will help your child build perspective.

Videos:

Helping Kids Process Violence, Trauma, Race in a World of Non-Stop News (Common Sense): Join child development, children’s health, and trauma-care experts in this practical talk about how parents and educators can help kids process potentially traumatic news. 

Racism and Violence How to Help Kids Handle the News (Child Mind Institute): Learn about the best, research-backed ways to handle tough conversations with kids about racist violence in the media and news.

Reading List for Toddlers – Teens Available for Download

June is LGBTQ+ Pride Month

A Brief History of Pride Month

In honor of the 1969 Stonewall Uprising in Manhattan, each June, Americans come together to celebrate LGBTQ+ Pride Month.

In June of 1969, patrons and supporters of the Stonewall Inn in New York City staged an uprising to resist the police harassment and persecution to which LGBTQ Americans were commonly subjected. This uprising marked the beginning of a movement to outlaw discriminatory law and practices against the LGBTQ community.1

Not only does Pride Month honor the Stonewall Uprising, it also commemorates those who have had an impact on history locally, nationally, and internationally.

Today, LGBTQ Americans partake in pride parades, picnics, parties, concerts and more in order to celebrate Pride Month.

This year events will be held virtually to practice social distancing.

If you, yourself are LGBTQIA+ and are looking for resources and support, here’s where you can start:

It Gets Better

It Gets Better is a social media campaign that offers hope and encouragement to young LGBTQ+ people.

The Trevor Project

Created in 1995, the Trevor Project offers  crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to LGBTQ young people under 25.

Pride for Youth

Pride For Youth offers education and support services for Nassau and Suffolk county LGBTQ youth.

Long Island LGBT Community Center

Long Island LGBT Community Center is located in Nassau, Suffolk, and Queens. They offer resources, regularly scheduled programs, and a public space for all ages to relax, study, hang out, and meet new people.

Q Chat Space

Q Chat Space is a bully-free online community of LGBTQ teens that can chat with other LGBTQ teens and trained professionals. Q Chat Space also works hard to verify its members and keep the online community a safe space.

Gender Spectrum Lounge

Gender Spectrum Lounge is a global online community that offers support to gender-expansive teens, their families and support professionals to connect, collaborate and find resources.

  1. https://youth.gov/feature-article/june-lgbt-pride-month

If you’re looking to read about Pride and non-fiction LGBTQ+ related topics, check out this bibliography that offers a variety of in-house books, audiobooks and e-books that can be downloaded from Hoopla.

Mental Health Awareness Month

Since 1949 the Mental Health America Organization has been observing the month of May as Mental Health Awareness Month. Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also determines how we handle stress, relate to others, and make healthy choices. 1  Mental health is important at every stage of our life!

Right now more than ever, it’s so important to talk about and take care of our Mental Health. Here are some resources for you to use to help better yourself or someone you know!:

Girls Health.Gov: The “Your Feelings” section of this website offers guidance to teenage girls on recognizing a mental health problem, getting help, and talking to parents. http://girlshealth.gov/feelings/index.html

Go Ask Alice!: Geared at young adults, this question and answer website contains a large database of questions about a variety of concerns surrounding emotional health. www.goaskalice.columbia.edu

Kelty Mental Health Resource Center: Reference sheets are provided that list top websites, books, videos, toolkits and support for mental health disorders. http://keltymentalhealth.ca/youth-and-young-adults

Teen Mental Health: Geared towards teenagers, this website provides learning tools on a variety of mental illnesses, videos, and resources for friends. http://teenmentalhealth.org/

Center for Young Women’s Health and Young Men’s Health: These websites provides a series of guides on emotional health, including anxiety, depression, bullying, and eating disorders. www.youngwomenshealth.org and www.youngmenshealthsite.org

Reach Out: This website provides information on specific mental health disorders, as well as resources to help teens make safe plans when feeling suicidal, and helpful tips on how to relax. http://au.reachout.com/

National Alliance on Mental Health:  Find resources for youth, including information on managing your mental health in college and making friends. www.nami.org/Find-Support/Teens-and-Young-Adults

Mindfulness for Teens: This website has resources to help teens use mindfulness to handle stress and includes apps to practice meditation and guided mediation recordings. http://mindfulnessforteens.com/

  1. Strengthening Mental Health PromotionExternal. Fact sheet no. 220. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization.

Homework Help

Hi everyone! Miss Charlotte here. One of the things I miss doing at the library is helping you tackle your homework. Are you at home now and stuck on a subject? Have you ever thought about watching an instructional video on it? Kanopy, our online-streaming service offers educational videos that supplement K- college learning! It’s really easy to use and has over 800 videos to offer. Below is a quick tutorial on how to find these videos on Kanopy!


If you’re still stuck on a subject you can always sign on to Brainfuse, our online one-on-one tutoring database. All you need is your library card! Check out the tutorial below.

https://my.nicheacademy.com/lindenhurst/course/5840