Find Your Next Great Read with Book Browse

The library is now offering Book Browse database to all of our patrons.

This website offers you in-depth book reviews, author interviews, book previews, and reading guides. There are many features that can help readers find the next book they will like and this database is meant to help you save time finding that next book. Here are some highlights from this comprehensive database:

What’s New” tab:

Under this tab you will find book news, articles, what other readers recommend, and what’s getting published this week.

You will also find the Editor’s Choice section. In this section, you can read reviews, an excerpt from the book and explore the historical, cultural and contextual aspects of the book.

Find Books” tab:

Under this tab you will find the Young Adults page.

You will also find a Featured Books section with hand-picked books for young adults and more recent titles.

Another great part of this page are the Reading Lists. You can click on any term and a list of books in that genre will come up for YA.

The Read-Alikes Tab:

If you enjoyed a certain book and would like to read something similar you can visit this section where you will find hand-selected read-alikes. It breaks it down for you by title to title and author to author recommendations.

This database is perfect for readers 10 and up! Visit Book Browse Here!

Banned Books Week

Banned Books Week reminds us to celebrate our freedom to read, draws attention to banned and challenged books, and highlights individuals who have been persecuted. Taking the time to read what you want is a part of exercising your First Amendment rights!

Keep the celebration up by doing these things:

Read a Banned Book

This may seem like an obvious choice, but it’s also the most effective! Check out this list of banned Children’s and YA books or choose one from our bibliography:

YA Banned/Challenged Books

Children’s Banned/Challenged Books

Reach Out to an Author

Tell an author how much their work means to you! Reach out to an author who’s on the banned books list or to an author you enjoy.

Writing a book takes a lot of effort and can be extremely challenging. You can reach out through social media, their websites or e-mail and let them know much you appreciate, value, and love the books they share with us.

Share a Banned Books Infographic

Infographics like this one from American Library Association can be posted and shared on social media apps. ALA has other infographics that can be downloaded and shared in order to spread awareness.

ALA Infographic Downloads

Join or Host a Virtual Read-Out

The Banned Books Week Read-Out is your way to stand up to censorship and exercise your rights by reading from a banned book or discussing censorship issues on camera. Since 1982, banned authors such as Judy Blume, Dav Pilkey, and John Green have participated in this read-out. Join them and others and have the chance to be added to the Banned Books Week YouTube channel.

Get Informed

Another great thing you can do is educate yourself. Read about what Banned Books week is and its history. Then learn about the history of the books that were challenged and banned.

Do you know the difference between a challenged book and a banned book? A challenge is only an attempt to remove or restrict material, based solely on the opinions of a person or group. Challenging a book is damaging because it could restrict access to others. When you ban a book, you remove the material.

#LookToLibraries

Did you know children’s library professionals have access to information, resources, and community partnerships that contribute to the development of materials, programs, and services that support families in their library communities? Through ALSC, you can create an informed media plan that best suits your family’s needs and navigate through the hardships brought on by COVID-19.

#LookToLibraries for Media Mentorship 

Navigating the extent of digital devices and content available to young children can be daunting for parents and caregivers, and even more so during times of crises. These resources help to develop a media plan that best addresses your family’s needs. These tools have been available through the library and, just as families have had to adapt their expectations and guidelines for media use, libraries are continuously adapting to accommodate new situations and new challenges, like that of the COVID-19 pandemic.   

Media Mentorship Tip Sheet – Learn more about media mentorship and how you can find excellent resources, model safe and effective digital device use, and find objective suggestions on creating a family media plan.

To Tech or Not to Tech? The Debate about Technology, Young Children, and the Library  By Kathleen Campana, J. Elizabeth Mills, Claudia Haines, Tess Prendergast, and Marianne Martens

Where Are We Now? The Evolving Use of New Media with Young Children in Libraries  By Kathleen Campana, J. Elizabeth Mills, Marianne Martens, Claudia Haines 

#LookToLibraries for Support during a Pandemic 

The resources below can help families and their children navigate and adjust to drastic changes in routines and the lack of access to familiar people and places as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Tough Conversations Tip Sheet  – Consider the strategies of Fred Rogers, of Mr. Rogers Neighborhood, that describe how to talk with children about difficult topics.

Apps, Podcasts, and Activities – Apps, podcasts, and activities to support family well-being during the pandemic.

Books for Older Children – Titles for older children that include nonfiction information about epidemics and ways to manage anxiety.

Books for Young Children – Books to help young children understand germs and how to cope with the feelings they may be having.

Comforting Reads – times of crises bring times of change. These books were selected to help children going through challenging situations like the death of a loved one, an unexpected move, natural disasters, and more. 

COVID-19 Expert Resources Tip Sheet  – Connections to information about the virus to help children understand the pandemic.

COVID-19 Resources Tip Sheet  – Print and online books, articles, apps, podcasts, and websites for youth and parents/caregivers to provide support during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Online Books for Children – Online books for children that address the COVID-19 pandemic and how to cope with its challenges.

Resources for Parents/Caregivers – Books and articles to help parents and caregivers on a range of topics, from caring for a newborn in the age of COVID-19 to trying to balance parenting and coping with the pandemic.

Tough Topics – The books on these lists are to help inspire conversations with children going through challenging situations like the death of a loved one, an unexpected move, natural disasters, and more. 

Drawing

One thing that I’ve always liked to do is draw. When I was growing up, I took lots of art classes in high school and a lot more in college. Every now and then I still make the time to draw, but I’m always looking for ways on how I can improve my skill. Do you like to draw too? Drawing is a great way to relax and develop creativity. With the help of some of these books from Overdrive or Libby, you can have fun learning how to draw.

https://livebrary.overdrive.com/media/554906
https://livebrary.overdrive.com/library/kids/media/3455705
https://livebrary.overdrive.com/media/576804
https://livebrary.overdrive.com/media/1000551
https://livebrary.overdrive.com/library/teens/media/1192990
https://livebrary.overdrive.com/library/teens/media/635380
https://livebrary.overdrive.com/library/kids/media/1260245

Social Justice: A Guide for Parents

Social justice is the view that everyone deserves to enjoy the same economic, political and social rights, regardless of race, socioeconomic status, gender or other characteristics.

Right now your child may have a lot of questions about what’s going on in our country. Here are some resources and books to facilitate important conversations and connections.

Websites and Articles:

Anti-Racism Resources for All Ages An excellent collection of videos, books, articles, and lessons on anti-racism, activism, and critical race theory curated by Dr. Nicole A. Cooke of the University of South Carolina.

Five Ways to Reduce Racial Bias in Your Children (by Greater Good magazine): Trustworthy practical tips from UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center.

Critical Racial and Social Justice Education Robin D’Angelo PhD offers resources, tools, and hand outs for parents, educators or anyone looking to learn about social justice.

Talking About Race (by the National Museum of African American History & Culture): This toolkit provides in-depth resources for caregivers, educators, and individuals to reflect on race, power, and privilege, all in the interest of having constructive, equity-oriented conversations.

Critical Media Project An indispensable collection of videos and activities focusing on how identity is represented and negotiated in media.

Social Justice Books (by Teaching for Change): Selected books for preschool and elementary aged children. This list of books intersects with all kinds of important cultural and social issues that will help your child build perspective.

Videos:

Helping Kids Process Violence, Trauma, Race in a World of Non-Stop News (Common Sense): Join child development, children’s health, and trauma-care experts in this practical talk about how parents and educators can help kids process potentially traumatic news. 

Racism and Violence How to Help Kids Handle the News (Child Mind Institute): Learn about the best, research-backed ways to handle tough conversations with kids about racist violence in the media and news.

Reading List for Toddlers – Teens Available for Download

June is LGBTQ+ Pride Month

A Brief History of Pride Month

In honor of the 1969 Stonewall Uprising in Manhattan, each June, Americans come together to celebrate LGBTQ+ Pride Month.

In June of 1969, patrons and supporters of the Stonewall Inn in New York City staged an uprising to resist the police harassment and persecution to which LGBTQ Americans were commonly subjected. This uprising marked the beginning of a movement to outlaw discriminatory law and practices against the LGBTQ community.1

Not only does Pride Month honor the Stonewall Uprising, it also commemorates those who have had an impact on history locally, nationally, and internationally.

Today, LGBTQ Americans partake in pride parades, picnics, parties, concerts and more in order to celebrate Pride Month.

This year events will be held virtually to practice social distancing.

If you, yourself are LGBTQIA+ and are looking for resources and support, here’s where you can start:

It Gets Better

It Gets Better is a social media campaign that offers hope and encouragement to young LGBTQ+ people.

The Trevor Project

Created in 1995, the Trevor Project offers  crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to LGBTQ young people under 25.

Pride for Youth

Pride For Youth offers education and support services for Nassau and Suffolk county LGBTQ youth.

Long Island LGBT Community Center

Long Island LGBT Community Center is located in Nassau, Suffolk, and Queens. They offer resources, regularly scheduled programs, and a public space for all ages to relax, study, hang out, and meet new people.

Q Chat Space

Q Chat Space is a bully-free online community of LGBTQ teens that can chat with other LGBTQ teens and trained professionals. Q Chat Space also works hard to verify its members and keep the online community a safe space.

Gender Spectrum Lounge

Gender Spectrum Lounge is a global online community that offers support to gender-expansive teens, their families and support professionals to connect, collaborate and find resources.

  1. https://youth.gov/feature-article/june-lgbt-pride-month

If you’re looking to read about Pride and non-fiction LGBTQ+ related topics, check out this bibliography that offers a variety of in-house books, audiobooks and e-books that can be downloaded from Hoopla.

Mental Health Awareness Month

Since 1949 the Mental Health America Organization has been observing the month of May as Mental Health Awareness Month. Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also determines how we handle stress, relate to others, and make healthy choices. 1  Mental health is important at every stage of our life!

Right now more than ever, it’s so important to talk about and take care of our Mental Health. Here are some resources for you to use to help better yourself or someone you know!:

Girls Health.Gov: The “Your Feelings” section of this website offers guidance to teenage girls on recognizing a mental health problem, getting help, and talking to parents. http://girlshealth.gov/feelings/index.html

Go Ask Alice!: Geared at young adults, this question and answer website contains a large database of questions about a variety of concerns surrounding emotional health. www.goaskalice.columbia.edu

Kelty Mental Health Resource Center: Reference sheets are provided that list top websites, books, videos, toolkits and support for mental health disorders. http://keltymentalhealth.ca/youth-and-young-adults

Teen Mental Health: Geared towards teenagers, this website provides learning tools on a variety of mental illnesses, videos, and resources for friends. http://teenmentalhealth.org/

Center for Young Women’s Health and Young Men’s Health: These websites provides a series of guides on emotional health, including anxiety, depression, bullying, and eating disorders. www.youngwomenshealth.org and www.youngmenshealthsite.org

Reach Out: This website provides information on specific mental health disorders, as well as resources to help teens make safe plans when feeling suicidal, and helpful tips on how to relax. http://au.reachout.com/

National Alliance on Mental Health:  Find resources for youth, including information on managing your mental health in college and making friends. www.nami.org/Find-Support/Teens-and-Young-Adults

Mindfulness for Teens: This website has resources to help teens use mindfulness to handle stress and includes apps to practice meditation and guided mediation recordings. http://mindfulnessforteens.com/

  1. Strengthening Mental Health PromotionExternal. Fact sheet no. 220. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization.

Homework Help

Hi everyone! Miss Charlotte here. One of the things I miss doing at the library is helping you tackle your homework. Are you at home now and stuck on a subject? Have you ever thought about watching an instructional video on it? Kanopy, our online-streaming service offers educational videos that supplement K- college learning! It’s really easy to use and has over 800 videos to offer. Below is a quick tutorial on how to find these videos on Kanopy!


If you’re still stuck on a subject you can always sign on to Brainfuse, our online one-on-one tutoring database. All you need is your library card! Check out the tutorial below.

https://my.nicheacademy.com/lindenhurst/course/5840